Make Your Own Chicken Bone Broth – From Basic To Adventurous

Make Your Own Chicken Bone Broth – From Basic To Adventurous

Bone Broth. The name alone sounds medieval, something that modern folks just don't eat. But more and more, people are turning to stock made with the bones of chicken, beef, fish, etc., for both excellent culinary flavors and traditional healing properties.

Admittedly, if you're new to the world of bone broth, the image above may put you off – but please read on. I will first present you with a recipe for smooth, basic chicken stock with the excellent benefits of bone broth sans the particular factors or heads, feet, and organs, and minimal contact with the actual chicken bones.

Why you should avoid store-bought chicken broth

Regardless of what parts of the bird you throw into your homemade chicken bone broth, it will always be more nutritious than store-bought, canned or cartoned broth. The reason is that the store bought variety contains lots of things that you don't want but is missing some of the most nutritious components. Here are the ingredients from a well known “organic free range” chicken broth:

Organic chicken broth (filtered water, organic chicken), organic onions, organic celery, organic carrots, sea salt, natural chicken flavor, organic spices, organic expeller pressed canola oil and/or safflower oil and/or sunflower oil.

At first glance, this list may look beautiful, even wholesome. But there's no reason why you'd have to add “natural chicken flavor” to chicken stock unless it wasn't outstanding chicken stock, to begin with. Furthermore, a good stock will certainly have plenty of nice chicken fat in it, so there's no reason to add vegetable oil to it either. And did you know that “natural chicken flavor” is essentially MSG? (source) Not a good thing.

The health benefits of bone broth

Every chef and foodie knows the key to a good soup or sauce is the stock, and unlike the canned or cartoned varieties which can sometimes pass in flavor, homemade broth is loaded with nutrients that its packaged cousins lack – minerals, gelatin, and glycosaminoglycans (which include substances like chondroitin and glucosamine, keratin and hyaluronic acid and more.) These nutrients are known to benefit teeth, bones, hair, nails, and joints.

Bone broth is also a digestive elixir that helps to heal the gut lining for those who suffer from digestive problems, food allergies, and nervous system conditions including anxiety and depression. There are even numerous claims I've read that regular consumption of bone broth will make cellulite disappear. I don't know about you, but that seems worth the broth for me!

Option 1:

Chicken bone broth for squeamish beginners and folks who “don't cook”

So you want the health benefits of bone broth, but haven't cooked much beyond boiling water for spaghetti and heating up sauce or grilling a chicken breast in a pan? No problem. Even the most remedial beginners, can master a basic chicken bone broth.

You know those rotisserie chickens that they sell at grocery stores? Perfectly cooked whole chicken, ready for you to take home for dinner = Real food for no effort…brilliant. If you are a true beginner, you probably buy the roasted chicken, pick off the meat and toss the bones in the… WAIT! Don't throw the bones away. This is where the fun begins.

You will need:

  • 1 rotisserie chicken
  • 1 T. apple cider vinegar
  • Filtered water
  • A crockpot or pot with a well-fitted lid
  • A fine metal sieve
  • Optional – onion and/or onion peels, carrots, celery

Beginner's bone broth method

  1. Eat your store-bought rotisserie chicken (preferably organic and free-range if you can find it).
  2. Place the remaining ‘frame' of the chicken (the bones, skin, and cartilaginous bits) into a crockpot or pot.
  3. Cover the bones with water, adding a tablespoon of apple cider vinegar per chicken frame.
  4. Cover and cook on low for a minimum of 6 hours up to 24 hours or until the bones crumble when pinched.
  5. Carefully strain the broth through a fine metal sieve and discard the bones.
  6. Use the broth immediately, store in the fridge for about a week or freeze for future use in ice cube trays for quick defrosting. If saving for later, I prefer to concentrate my broth by simmering it until it is half of its volume to keep on space in my fridge or freezer.

Ok, I've got bone broth – What do I do with it now?

Bone broth can be very consumed merely by sipping from a mug like tea. I usually suggest doing so 1-3 times per day for its therapeutic benefits. Beyond that, use your beautiful broth as the base for soups and sauces; to cook rice or quinoa or in any recipe that calls for stock.

Option 2:

Chicken both broth – A simple, classic preparation


If you regularly roast your own chickens at home, you can follow the instructions above. While I love a down-home chicken dinner complete with mash and gravy, I actually find that poaching a whole chicken in a crockpot yields more consistently tender meat that is easier to remove from the bones completely.


You will need:

  • 1 whole chicken, including giblets
  • 1 T. apple cider vinegar
  • Filtered water
  • A crock pot
  • A fine metal sieve
  • Optional – onion and/or onion peels, carrots, celery
  • Optional – rubber kitchen gloves

The classic chicken bone broth in a crockpot – method

  1. Remove the (defrosted or fresh) chicken from its packaging. Taking care to remove any giblet bag inside the cavity, rinse and place the chicken and giblets in the crock pot.
  2. Add filtered water just to cover the chicken.
  3. Turn the crockpot to low and cook for 3-4 hours (depending on the size of the chicken and the heat of your pot) until the chicken is just cooked.
  4. Gently remove the chicken to a bowl and allow to cool slightly. Wearing optional gloves to protect your hands from the hot meat, remove the perfectly cooked chicken and place in a separate bowl. Put the bones, skin, and other ‘bits' back into the crockpot with the broth.
  5. Add apple cider vinegar to the pot of bones and broth, cover, and continue simmering on low for 6-12 hours or until the bones break easily.
  6. Carefully strain the broth through a fine metal sieve and discard the bones.
  7. Use the broth immediately, store in the fridge for about a week or freeze for future use in ice cube trays for quick defrosting. If saving for later, I prefer to concentrate my broth by simmering it until it is half of its volume to keep on space in my fridge or freezer.


Option 3:

Why in the world would you want to add feet and heads to your bone broth?


Once you've mastered the classic chicken bone broth, you may start to find yourself curious about the strange chicken parts that your farmer or butcher may sell. Today, in a boneless-skinless-chicken-breast culture, we are trained to think that lean muscle meat is the best source of animal protein. Au contraire! It is indeed the garbage, the bones, and the fat of adequately raised animals that provide us with the essential fat-soluble vitamins and micro-minerals that are entirely lacking in ‘white meat.'

Throughout human history, the traditional cultures worldwide that enjoyed vibrant health intuitively knew that the practice of eating the whole animal (be it bison, fowl, or fish) would provide the most profound nutritional benefits. They prized the organ meats, cooked with rendered animal fats, and made soup broth from the bones. 


Chicken stock made with the unusual parts is a beautiful way to incorporate the nutritional benefits of the ‘whole animal' without having to sit down with a knife and fork to these parts on a plate. When you receive the heads and feet from your farmer, they most likely have already been cleaned, so there is nothing more to do other than gingerly or exuberantly dump them in your stock pot.

Prepare the stock using the classic method above, adding as few or as many heads, feet, necks, and giblets as you may desire or have on hand. I tend to do a weekly stock with my leftover chicken bones, throwing in a couple of heads and a handful of feet plus the contents of the giblet bag. Then every few months or so, I whip out my monster pot and make a massive batch to have on hand with necks, backs, head, feet, and organs.

Original Author: http://holisticsquid.com/making-chicken-bone-broth-from-basic-to-adventurous/

CHECK OUT SOME OF OUR OTHER RESOURCES ABOUT BONE BROTH:

Looking to Purchase Bone Broth Online? Click Here

About Broth & Co - Melbourne Based Bone Broth Company

What is Bone Broth?

Where to Buy Bone Broth?

Broth & Co Recipe, News & Blog