Bone Broth RECIPE

Bone Broth RECIPE

Bone Broth

Stomach soothing bone broths form the foundation of many of our meals along with plenty of probiotic foods. Bone broth is a nourishing all-rounder packed with vitamins, minerals, collagen and keratin which makes it fantastic for skin – including the dreaded cellulite! The healthy fats in the broth help you to assimilate essential vitamins including Vit D.

Stomach soothing bone broths form the foundation of many of our meals along with plenty of probiotic foods. Bone broth is a nourishing all-rounder packed with vitamins, minerals, collagen and keratin which makes it fantastic for skin – including the dreaded cellulite! The healthy fats in the broth help you to assimilate essential vitamins including Vit D.
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Introduction

The nutrient-rich bone broth is at the heart of what we do. Full of flavor and deeply nourishing, broth (also known as stock) made from meat and fish bones have been used as a homemade remedy across cultures and, in our opinion, is the secret to a great-tasting soup. Simple to make, soothing and nourishing, bone broth is one of the oldest, most affordable homemade foods, often used to cure soothe and nurture the sick.

Ingredients

Serves 3–4 liters depending on your pan size

  • 2–3 kg beef bones, chicken carcasses, lamb bones
  • 2 handfuls of any onions, leeks, carrots or celery ends
  • 1 tbsp black peppercorns
  • A few dried bay leaves

Optional
A generous splash of apple cider vinegar or fresh lemon juice (this can help to extract the minerals from the meat bones)

How To:

 

  1.  Place the bones and any additional ingredients into a large stainless steel cooking pot and cover with cold water. The water level should cover the bones by 5 cm while still leaving the room at the top of the pan.
  2.  Cover with a lid and bring to the boil. Reduce the heat and simmer, lid on, for at least 6 hours for chicken and 12 for beef or lamb, skimming off any foam that rises to the top. The longer the bones simmer, the more nutrients are released. We like to boil the chicken carcass for up to 12 hours until the bones begin to crumble and keep beef bones going for 24 hours until they look as if they were washed up on a beach.
  3. Fresh chicken carcasses from the butcher usually have a fair amount of meat on them. We tend to poach the bodies for 20 minutes, then pull off the meat (and save it for another meal like a chicken salad or chicken pho) before returning the carcasses to the pot and continuing to simmer to make broth.
  4. Strain the liquid, using a fine mesh strainer for poultry. Use immediately or leave to cool before storing (preferably in glass/ceramic rather than plastic). Bone broth will keep in the fridge for several days or up to a week if you leave it undisturbed, as a layer of fat will form on the surface and keep it sealed from the air.

Notes:

You can also make Bone Broth using a slow-cooker. Just turn to high and cook for 12 hours or more.

Broth will happily keep in the fridge for up to a week. Divide your batch between 2 containers. This will allow you to use up one jar over the first few days while the second form a fat layer which will keep it right for the second half of the week.

Small portions of Bone Broth are great for cooking up quinoa or braising vegetables, and larger containers are great for making batches of soups, curries, and stews.

Beef Bones produce a lot of nutritious fat – (skim some of it and save it for roasting vegetables). Any leftovers can be stored in the fridge for up to three days or freeze the stock in a glass container.

Original Author: http://www.hemsleyandhemsley.com/recipe/bone-broth/

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